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The Times
  • Little Falls projects move toward completion

  • A pair of projects in the city of Little Falls are moving toward completion.

    Mayor Robert J. Peters, Sr. reported at Monday’s meeting of the city Board of Public Works the South Ann Street Bridge project is on schedule to meet its December deadline.

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  • A pair of projects in the city of Little Falls are moving toward completion.
    Mayor Robert J. Peters, Sr. reported at Monday’s meeting of the city Board of Public Works the South Ann Street Bridge project is on schedule to meet its December deadline.
    “We know the main crane was delivered Monday,” he said during a telephone interview Tuesday. “Some of the steel arrived Monday and the rest should arrive to day. They’ll be working on the steel and once that is in place, they’ll put the decking on.”
    He said there was a delay of about two weeks while the crew waited for the steel to arrive.
    “They’ll be working on Saturdays too now instead of just Monday through Friday,” said Peters.
    Another project discussed at Monday’s meeting was the decommissioning of the sewage sludge incinerator at the wastewater treatment plant.
    Currently, sludge is mechanically dewatered and incinerated on site. Ash from the incinerator is disposed of at the Oneida - Herkimer Solid Waste Authority’s regional landfill.
    Peters said burning the waste uses a high volume of oil and electricity.
    Regulatory issues led city officials to explore several alternatives on how to process and dispose of the sludge and they found that revamping the plant would cost the city close to $1 million.
    The mayor credited Sam Ostasz, wastewater treatment plant operator, and Jim Palmer of the Board of Public Works with finding a Pennsylvania company that takes the material, squeezes it down, puts it into a container, mixes it with chemicals and puts the material to use.
    Work is currently under way on the project to get the new system up and running and is expected to be completed in four to six weeks. The cost of the project will be approximately $98,536.
    It was noted the furnace being used now is in bad shape and workers will try to keep it going during the next few weeks until the work is completed.
    The board also discussed the tree harvesting program at the city’s watershed. Logging that area has provided revenue for the city over the years, but Dan Bennett of the water treatment plant said the city does not have legal access to the right-of-way to reach some portions of the watershed for logging purposes. “We need permission to get in there,” he said.
    While city officials have been looking through old deeds for a solution to the problem, no access has been found other than to contact the landowners to ask permission to use the private road.
    “Fourteen or fifteen people own the roadway going into where we need to go,” the mayor explained.
    He said this year the timber will have to be harvested from the areas the city does have access to in order to gain the necessary revenue to keep from having to raise water rates.
    Page 2 of 2 - Peters said the city will have to seek permission to use the roadway in the future and needs to work on a tree harvesting and replanting plan for the area.

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