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The Times
  • Retired Little Falls mayor enjoying family time

  • Inside the garage of a Little Falls home, dozens of photos, plaques and other memorabilia hang in remembrance of a lifetime of politics.

    For 45 years, Ted Wind, 82, was immersed in the political world, but now he’s traded in his suits and political clout for time with his grandchildren, cheering them on at games and following his favorite professional teams.

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  • Inside the garage of a Little Falls home, dozens of photos, plaques and other memorabilia hang in remembrance of a lifetime of politics.
    For 45 years, Ted Wind, 82, was immersed in the political world, but now he’s traded in his suits and political clout for time with his grandchildren, cheering them on at games and following his favorite professional teams.
    “I think I did my time, and it’s time for someone else to step up,” Wind said of his tenure as the Democratic Little Falls mayor and Herkimer County legislator.
    Wind has been retired from office for about five years and said he has little interest in getting involved again. He said, however, he keeps a watchful eye on what’s going on in the community.
    “I love the city. I’d do anything to help the city,” he said. “It’s a great community.”
    Even though he first ran for Little Falls mayor in 1966 because a friend in office encouraged him, Wind’s dedication to the community also played a part.
    “I didn’t like the way the city was going downhill,” he said. “I met the right people and fortunately was able to bring a lot of good things to the community.”
    Wind’s most memorable political moves included revitalization of Main Street and building an interchange from the Thruway to the city — where a bridge has been named after him.
    It wasn’t until 2007 that Wind decided to forgo running for re-election.
    Throughout his Church Street home, walls are covered in photos of his family — a reminder of why he’s stepped out of the political scene.
    “I spend time with my grandchildren and watch them play sports,” he said.
    Wind said he was a huge sports fan when he was growing up, playing baseball, basketball and football in high school and while in the Army.
    Sports provide a camaraderie that Wind said he found enticing within the office as well.
    “I love politics because I love dealing with people,” he said. “It’s rewarding doing things for the community.”
    Wind now takes what he’s learned from his years in office and applies his passion for it to teaching his children and grandchildren.
    “You do what you want to do because you feel it’ll be rewarding — not monetarily, but for the community,” he said.
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