|
|
|
The Times
  • HCCC’s renovated science labs ‘amazing’

  • Bonita Gibb hovered over a new microscope examining a piece of cardiac muscle.

    While the Herkimer County Community College student did not take science classes prior to construction of the $2.8 million laboratory renovation project, she is benefiting from the better organized, high-technology equipped, spacious and cheery classrooms at the college.

    • email print
  • Bonita Gibb hovered over a new microscope examining a piece of cardiac muscle.
    While the Herkimer County Community College student did not take science classes prior to construction of the $2.8 million laboratory renovation project, she is benefiting from the better organized, high-technology equipped, spacious and cheery classrooms at the college.
    Fifty percent of the cost of renovations was matched by the state, while the other half is being funded by donations.
    For about two weeks, students and faculty have enjoyed the refurbished science labs in the Edward Manning and Shirley Angar Gaynor Science Center.
    Last week, biology Professor Jennifer Herzog wrote on a white-painted portion of the wall — which serves as a white board — in the front of the microbiology lab as a few of her students analyzed microbes. “It’s amazing. It’s so much more spacious,” she said. “I’m finally able to get everything taught with students working in a safe environment.”
    Herzog said students and faculty were impressed with the renovations, and noted she can see all her students as they work. “We had the ‘ahh’ factor when we opened the door,” she said.
    During the planning process, faculty was asked for their opinions on what should be included in each of the specific labs — microbiology, chemistry, biology, physics and anatomy.
    Each room is equipped with 24 stations.
    From new microscopes, computers and touch-screen televisions to clear cabinets for easily finding tools, the five labs were designed with everyone in mind.
    “It was everything I asked for down to the pull-out drawers,” Herzog said as she pulled a wooden slab hidden within one of the stations.
    The new labs also means the college will be able to offer more classes as well as new programs down the line, said Henry Testa, associate dean of academic affairs for business, health, science and technology.
    Down the hall, physics and astronomy Professor Faith Thompson said her request was for plenty of outlets. “Plenty, where they’re not dangerous,” she said, noting the stations are large enough to fit the equipment now and don’t bulk under the weight.
    “They’re stable for vibrations,” Thompson said.
    Second-year student Jennifer Canter, who sat in Thompson’s lab room, said the old labs made it difficult to work in groups.
    “Compared to the old labs, (these) are more functional and easier to get around in,” she said.

      calendar