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The Times
  • Flooding damages Jarvis Middle School

  • Jarvis Middle School sustained flood damage that could amount to $980,000.

    Central Valley Central School Superintendent Cosimo Tangorra, Jr. said during Monday evening’s board of education meeting the building has been evaluated by the district’s architects and on-site contractors and could be subject to an emergency repair project.

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  • Jarvis Middle School sustained flood damage that could amount to $980,000.
    Central Valley Central School Superintendent Cosimo Tangorra, Jr. said during Monday evening’s board of education meeting the building has been evaluated by the district’s architects and on-site contractors and could be subject to an emergency repair project.
    “The damage was to the ground floor of the building, including the gymnasium, library and technology room. The good news is that it appears as though we will be able to save the gym floor, as only half the floor was flooded by water. Some water did get under the floorboards, but we are using dehumidification systems to remove the water out and it looks as though the floor is beginning to correct itself. Since the floor will be stripped and sanded as part of the transition process, I believe we will be able to save it,” he said.
    Tangorra added if the gymnasium floor had to be replaced as result of the recent flooding in the village of Mohawk it would be the third time since the building reopened in 1996.
    Business Manager Ken Long said if the floor were to be replaced, the district would likely replace it with a surface made of synthetic materials. “We wouldn’t put wood back down,” he said. “It would be too costly, especially since this situation could occur again.”
    Tangorra said the damage would not put the start of school in jeopardy.
    “It will look like a building that is going through a construction project. Our students should be used to that by now with the number of building projects that took place at the former Ilion and Mohawk schools the past few years,” he said.
    Tangorra said the district would put the immediate repair project to bid soon as possible and would likely have to apply for short-term funding to pay for it.
    He added the district’s insurance would cover $15,000 of the cost and if it were deemed to be eligible, the project would be eligible for 98 percent state aid.|
    Long said the district would also seek out other avenues of funding, including possible Federal Emergency Management Agency funding should President Barack Obama accept Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s request for a federal disaster declaration, to pay for the project.
    Tangorra also said he would continue to inquire whether the former Ilion Central School District’s EXCEL moneys could be used to cover a portion of the repair.
    “With the change in the weather patterns this type of flooding could occur again as early as next spring or summer, so we may have to begin to look for long-term solutions,” said board of education member Vicki Judd. “These types of repairs are not something the district can afford to make year after year. We need to find a long-term fix.”
    Page 2 of 2 - Tangorra said he would like to form a committee to discuss a possible building project for the Jarvis building to prevent this type of damage from occurring again.
    “One of the issues is that the section of building that was damaged was built below grade. We need to start looking for a way to correct the issues we know exist. There may not be a simple answer to the problem, but we have try and find a permanent fix for it,” he said.
    The repair project will also include field, pavement and sidewalk site work.
    In other business Monday evening, the board of education approved a lease agreement with Herkimer BOCES for the use of the former Remington Elementary School building in the village of Ilion. Tangorra said the agreement is for five years and will pay the Central Valley Central School District $92,500 a year. As part of the agreement, BOCES will supply a custodian during the day and Central Valley will supply cleaners at night.
    Tangorra said the building will be 100 percent in use during the day with high school and adult programming, as well as other BOCES services. In the evening, the Central Valley school district will open the building up for public use, he said.
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