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The Times
  • Herkimer Community Museum a blast from the past

  • Area residents don’t have to go to museums in New York City or Washington, D.C., to see dinosaur or ancient Egyptian exhibits — they can see both in Herkimer.

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  • Area residents don’t have to go to museums in New York City or Washington, D.C., to see dinosaur or ancient Egyptian exhibits — they can see both in Herkimer.

    The Herkimer Community Museum on North Prospect Street features exhibits with dinosaur fossils and artifacts from the tomb of King Tut. All collections are replicas on loan from the International Museum Institute of New York.
    At noon Sunday, the museum will be celebrating its one-year anniversary. The event will have rock climbing tutorials, crafts, face painting and snacks. Admission is $1.
    Museum Director Daniel Sargent said the celebration is meant to recognize the success of the museum since it’s inception in March 2012, and to raise awareness for its mission.
    “We want people to know that this resource is here and to take advantage (of it),” Sargent said. “The mission of the museum is to provide an accessible education featuring recourses that are museum-quality items, which almost certainly wouldn’t be available in the village of Herkimer otherwise.”
    Since the museum opened, it has attracted more than 1,000 visitors, including more than 300 school children.
    The museum is a collaborative effort among the village of Herkimer, Herkimer County Community College, the International Museum Institute of New York, Herkimer Now, the Frank. J. Basloe Public Library and several other local businesses that donated money and materials to the institution.
    Inside the museum’s dinosaur exhibit are three sections: Mesozoica, Paleomania and Fossil Dig. Within the ancient Egypt exhibit there is one section: Tutankhamun.
    Sargent pointed out that Fossil Dig is the most hands-on part of the museum.
    “The exhibits are all geared toward small children … or families with small children, so it’s all cool stuff, but they can’t touch it,” he said. “With Fossil Dig there is a sand pit where the kids can uncover fossils; we give them brushes to dust off what they find. We’re telling them about the delicate and careful work of paleontologists.” 
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