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The Times
  • New South Ann Street Bridge opens

  • The new South Ann Street Bridge opened Friday after the completion of a $1.4 million replacement project that got under way in August.

    Completion of the project was a week or so behind schedule, according to Little Falls Mayor Robert Peters, but not late enough to be a problem. The bridge spans the Mohawk River and is the primary vehicle and pedestrian route from downtown to Loomis and Moss islands.

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  • The new South Ann Street Bridge opened Friday after the completion of a $1.4 million replacement project that got under way in August.
    Completion of the project was a week or so behind schedule, according to Little Falls Mayor Robert Peters, but not late enough to be a problem. The bridge spans the Mohawk River and is the primary vehicle and pedestrian route from downtown to Loomis and Moss islands.
    “Everything is usually closed over on the other side this time of year anyway,” he said. “Right now it’s open to the two residents who live over there.” He said the sidewalk had remained open during the project to allow pedestrian access, but now the residents will also have vehicle access.
    Peters added a “no through traffic” sign remains posted on the bridge, but that restriction will be lifted in the spring.
    Paving remains to be completed on the bridge’s entrance and exit and this will be done when the asphalt plants open again in the spring, according to Peters. He noted the completion of the main part of the project will ease the parking problems in the area caused by the construction.
    The mayor thanked all those who had been patient throughout the project, adding the work had to be done at a time when water levels were low.
    Peters expects the city will again be issuing permits for rock climbing on Moss Island.
    “I know the city washed its hands of issuing permits for Moss Island,” he said. “We couldn’t get an ambulance or a fire truck over there. For a year or so we didn’t know who was over there.”
    He expects a ribbon-cutting ceremony will be scheduled in the spring.
    Built in 1933, the old city-owned bridge was red-flagged by the Department of Transportation and was considered to be functionally obsolete and structurally deficient.
    The new 20-ton bridge was designed by Albany-based WSP SELLS and constructed by Glenmont-based New Century Construction. It uses a four-beam design, compared with the outdated two-girder design of the old bridge, which will make it more hydraulically efficient, David Weiss, of WSP Sells told the city’s Common Council when the project was discussed. It will also provide an additional four-and-a-half feet of clearance, which will prevent rising water from damaging the bridge and the utility lines it carries.

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