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The Times
  • Sheriffs team up for Yellow Dot Program

  • Three county sheriffs joined together on Wednesday to show support for a new program that can help first responders in an emergency situation.

    The Yellow Dot Program notifies emergency personnel of any medical issues someone may have if they are involved in an motor vehicle or home accident.

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  • Three county sheriffs joined together on Wednesday to show support for a new program that can help first responders in an emergency situation.
    The Yellow Dot Program notifies emergency personnel of any medical issues someone may have if they are involved in an motor vehicle or home accident.
    “[During] that crucial hour after an accident, that information is all available,” said Herkimer County Sheriff Christopher Farber during a press conference at the historic Herkimer County Courthouse on North Main Street in the village of Herkimer. “[We] hope to help save lives.”
    The program is being sponsored by the state Sheriff’s Association and is free to the public.
    The Yellow Dot kits are now available at the Herkimer, Oneida and Madison sheriff department offices. Kits can also be mailed to an individual by visiting the website.
    Participants will need to place a yellow dot decal on the rear driver’s side window of their vehicle and place a medical information card inside their vehicle’s glove compartment.
    A recent photo of the individual should also be included with the information card to help identify them in the event they are unable to communicate with first responders, said Farber.
    The Yellow Dot Program can also be used in the home, with the decal placed near the front door and the medical information card in the freezer compartment of the refrigerator. The medical information card will include the individual’s contacts, physician’s name, medications and allergies.
    Madison County Sheriff Allen Riley said his department has had calls for an intoxicated driver swerving all over the road, when really it is a diabetic that has gone into insulin shock.
    “This is very good program for people who are on medications,” he said.
    Farber said about 30 counties around the state were implementing the program, which was initially started in Connecticut in 2002 by the People’s United Bank.
    “We’re here for the same purpose: to do what we can to protect the general public,” said Oneida County Sheriff Robert Maciol. “It’s not just for first responders, but whoever is first at an accident scene.”
    Farber noted any civilian that happens upon an accident scene before emergency personnel should call 911. “If in a situation, a civilian is first on the scene, with this program, they can answer some questions for 911,” he said.
    The second phase of the program will be notifying local police and fire departments about the program.
    For more information, go to www.nysheriffs.org/yellowdot.
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