|
|
|
The Times
  • Dolgeville remembers 9/11 victims during ceremony

  • Dolgeville residents paused for a moment Tuesday evening to remember the nearly 3,000 victims and heroes who were killed during the terrorist attacks against the U.S. 11 years ago.

    Firefighters and police officers gathered with the public during the 9/11 remembrance ceremony at the flagpoles in Plowe Park. It was the first ceremony of its kind to take place in the village.

    • email print
  • Dolgeville residents paused for a moment Tuesday evening to remember the nearly 3,000 victims and heroes who were killed during the terrorist attacks against the U.S. 11 years ago.
    Firefighters and police officers gathered with the public during the 9/11 remembrance ceremony at the flagpoles in Plowe Park. It was the first ceremony of its kind to take place in the village.
    “It was a spur of the moment kind of thing, but it is something that is long overdue,” said Dolgeville Police Chief Richard Congdon, one of the ceremony’s organizers. “Hopefully, this is something that we can continue to do every year, because it’s important to remember the events of that day.”
    Mayor Bruce Lyon, who is a member of the Dolgeville Volunteer Fire Department, agreed.
    “This is something that should have been done years ago,” he said. “We need to remember the lives that were lost and the heroism of the responders. Now that the first ceremony has taken place, we can think of ideas on how to improve the ceremony for next year. It’s important we don’t forget.”
    During the ceremony Congdon and Lyon recounted their personal experiences on Sept. 11, 2001.
    Congdon said he learned of the attacks on the World Trade Center while riding in a patrol car and his thoughts quickly turned to his son who was working as a police officer in New York City at the time.
    “If it wasn’t his pass day, he would have been there that morning,” he said. “Personally, I couldn’t believe what I was hearing on the scanner. I didn’t know what to think about what was happening.”
    Lyon said his thoughts on Sept. 11, 2001, were with his son who worked in New York City.
    “We just wanted to hear that he was all right. When we did, we were relieved,” he said.
    Louis Dunderdale, a veteran of the U.S. armed forces, also agreed with Congdon’s sentiments. He said the tragic events of 9/11 triggered a new awareness from the public toward terrorist attacks.
    “We need to remember it so it is not repeated and so people stay alert and aware,” he said.
    Firefighter Daniel Akler was among those to respond in the wake of the attack and thanked his wife and family for understanding it was something he had to do. A member of a disaster response team, Akler said he wanted to make a difference in the hours after the attack on the World Trade Center.
    “I wanted to treat people — victims, responders, anyone. But no one came to me,” he said. “Even though I personally did not treat anyone in the hours after the attack, my response team remained in New York City during the days after the attack and I am proud of the work we accomplished. I haven’t talked about my experience in New York City since 2001, so to be able to speak about it now is like taking a weight off my chest. Personally, ceremonies like this one mean a lot to me.”
      • calendar