|
|
|
The Times
  • SUNY-ESF professors tour Moss Island

  • As part of the continuing effort to have Moss Island recognized as a New York State Park, two professors from the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry toured the City of Little Falls landmark Thursday.

    • email print
  • As part of the continuing effort to have Moss Island recognized as a New York State Park, two professors from the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry toured the City of Little Falls landmark Thursday.
    Cheryl Doble and Maren King, director and assistant director of the Center for Community Design Research at SUNY-ESF, respectively, joined Little Falls City Historian Ed Vogt on a walking tour to prepare plans for a possible student project that will assist the city in its endeavor.
    “It is our intention to help the city administration develop a plan that will address such issues as access and how to tie the park into the city landscape as a whole,” said Doble, who assisted the Village of Dolgeville with its “Visioning” process in the late 1990s and early 2000s. “This is a very unique area, an area that is rich in natural and cultural history. We are interested in working with the City of Little Falls to devise a plan that will take full advantage of everything that Moss Island has to offer. There are definitely opportunities here to make this park something special.”
    Doble and King agreed that Moss Island is a place that city residents can take pride in.
    “This is an amazing place,” said Doble, who has visited the site before. “Working on this project would be a great opportunity for our students, as it will challenge them by having them consider such things as the historic and cultural relevance of the site, as well its recreational aspects.”
    Doble said as with the project conducted in Dolgeville, the students will welcome community input throughout the process.
    “This park is located in their city, so it is important to get a sense of what makes it so special to the residents,” she said. “It is also important for us to get an idea of what they would like to see incorporated in and around the park, as this will be their park when the process is completed.”
    “We are continuing to move forward with our effort,” said Vogt. “An item that is important to me, and that I would like to see incorporated into the park, is that the word ‘glacial’ be included in its name. The name should be Moss Island Glacial State Park, because that is why it is so unique.”
    Doble said that as the next step in their project, she and King would likely return with students next month.
    “This park would make for an interested project,” said King. “Because the students would have to consider so much, and because it would give them the opportunity to work with city government and with state government, as they would need to work with the Canal Corporation.”
    Moss Island, which is 1,500 feet in length and 625 feet in width, was recognized by the National Park Service as a National Natural Landmark in 1976. It received the recognition for possessing exceptional value as an example of the nation’s natural heritage.
    Page 2 of 2 - While it is not actually an island, but rather an igneous intrusion separating the highest lock in the Erie Canal system from the natural bed of the Mohawk River, Moss Island remains a favorite site among rock climbers and hikers wanting to see the glacial formed potholes.
    The effort to have Moss Island recognized as a State Park was begun by former Mayor Ted Wind.
    In May, representatives from the New York State Canal Corporation, including Director Carmella Mantello, and the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation took a similar walking tour of the site with Vogt and Mayor Bob Peters as the next step in the process.
      • calendar